Editing Smart Objects—PNG & JPEG

A Tip for Working With Photoshop Smart Objects

During a discussion about the limitations of editing Photoshop Smart Objects, some of us brought up for the thousandth plus time how frustrating it is to open a JPEG or PNG Smart Object, edit it, and then have to destructively flatten the file back to its original state before we can save the edits to our document.  A good problem-solver in the group took a look and said the real problem is JPEG and PNG files open into their own format, which cannot accept layers, whereas a PSD will open as a PSB file, which can handle layers. The trick, then, is to get the JPEG or PNG file to open as a PSB file.

And to do that, our problem-solving friend told us, run the Convert to Smart Object command on the Smart Object layer containing the JPEG or PNG. Now when I double-click on the Smart Object icon to open it, I’ll see the file format is a PSB file. This will increase the original document’s file size, but it also means I can pile on the layers, layer styles, and even Smart Filters to my heart’s content, just so long as I’m willing to sacrifice extra disk space when saving it.

Original example of PNG file
The original file that I want to alter.
PNG file being edited with layers
The file was placed in my PSD document as a Smart Object, but if I want to edit that file, Photoshop informs me I have to flatten the layers to return the file to its original state.

One reason I might be willing to accept larger files is if I thought that many edits, or days, later, I might change my mind about the edits I’ve made. Having already made one destructive edit, I’d have to make a second, even if the only change to all the edits I wanted to make was to the one of the edits. My Layers panel, too, will be more manageable if I don’t add a lot of clipped adjustment layers above the basic PNG or JPEG Smart Object layers. I inevitably make some kind of mistake where I lose the clipping, and now my adjustment layer is affecting everything below it. For a subtle adjustment, I might not even notice before I’ve begun adjusting everything to match the mistake. I’d rather have those layers tucked away inside the Smart Object.  Add to that, the fewer layers I have to deal with, the clearer I can see what I want to alter or replace, and I’m not scrolling and scrolling and scrolling to find it.

The converted PSB file
By converting the original placed Smart Object layer to a Smart Object once again, double-clicking on that Smart Object to edit it proves the file is now a PSB file and can retain all the layers, filters, and other effects that a PSD file can retain. Notice that the image above opened at 50%, but this image opened at 100%. That’s because I had transformed the original Smart Object layer before I converted it again to a new Smart Object. This is 100% of the converted Smart Object. The original, if I double-clicked on the Smart Object layer visible in this screenshot, is still the full size file I imported. It is also still a PNG file.
Images compared after editing PSB file
Not happy with the strong pinks, I was able to come back and re-edit the Smart Object using the original layers I had added to the PSB file.

Now that I know that the trick to allowing for layers is to create a PSB file, and that creating that file is as easy as simply converting a Smart Object layer containing a PNG or JPEG to another Smart Object layer, I’ll be using that trick often. Smart Objects have many idiosyncrasies, but they offer some of the best protection against destructive editing we have, and are worth mastering.

"At School" art journal composite image
From my Democracy series, “At School” art journals a tweet by Harry Potter author, J. K. Rowling. Credits go mainly to Eenas, Finecrafted, and Holliewood.
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MagicSquire for Photoshop

A Brush and Tool preset organizer

Last week during a discussion on the lack of good organization features in Photoshop’s Brushes panels, someone mentioned that they had recently purchased MagicSquire (https://anastasiy.com/magicsquire), a new extension that allows the user to organize brushes into groups, as well as create thumbnail previews and edit the brushes themselves.

This isn’t the developer’s first application. DiskFonts and both MagicPicker and MixColor have been around for some time. MagicSquire is almost brand new, but the developer is putting a lot of effort into bringing in new features, and responds to feedback posted on his feedback page within a day’s time. In the week I’ve owned MagicSquire, I’ve received two updates, and two positive responses to my own feedback requests.

MagicSquire isn’t the only brush organizer out there. I’ve heard good words for both Brusherator and Brush Box, but I’ve only visited their websites; I’ve never used them. I’ve also been using Brush Pilot as a brush viewer for a good many years. However, it’s not been updated for a very long time and has tended to crash more often in Yosemite on my Mac. The website only lists compatibility up to Mavericks. While it’s Mac only, I have seen that there are brush viewers out there for Windows.

Brush Pilot doesn’t work within Photoshop, but previews .abr files with scalable thumbnails and installs them into Photoshop. You can also export PNG files from an .abr file with or without transparency, which can be very handy. You can even Print to PDF to create a contact sheet. You need to use Photoshop’s Preset Manager for any other operations. However, I find being able to preview the contents of an .abr file before installing it so valuable, I’m very happy to have Brush Pilot even if it is no longer being developed and does sometimes have a crashing fit. I have long requested that Bridge take over this role, but so far, nothing has come of that request.

Brush Pilot screen shots
Brush Pilot scans your entire computer searching for .abr files. Any it finds it presents in a tree structure. One pane of the tree structure is devoted to brushes already installed. Click on any .abr file and it previews the contents, using scalable thumbnails to make previewing easy.
MagicSquire's Interface for brushes and edit mode
The bottom image displays the groups, including groups for tools such as the Mixer Brush and the Smudge tool, which are indicated by small icons. In the top panel, the brush shown below in the red box has had stroke thumbnails generated for it—similar to choosing Stroke Thumbnail in Photoshop’s brush panels, but with more options. The Edit dialog lets you name/rename, pick a preview, create a new brush preset, or update the current brush.

For “The Refugee,” (detail above, full image at the end of this post) I used several brushes to create the texture, and it was much easier than it has ever been to select the Brushes and Tool Presets I used, thanks to MagicSquire’s ability to sort them into groups and present a visual reference. I also was able to easily modify a brush and click on the  New Preset icon to save it directly into the same group—or into any group I first targeted.Brushes can be dragged from one group to another, and new groups can be created to organize brushes at any time. Renaming brushes is possible any time you double-click on a brush to enter the Edit mode. The dialog is fully resizable, and with the latest update, you can choose to view a compact mode instead of the full panel. It shrinks the panel to the size of the brush thumbnail until you hover over it, then expands to the full panel while you select another brush. Move your cursor away again and it automatically shrinks back.

Note that in Compact mode, there currently appears to be a bug: double-clicking on a brush to edit it does open the Edit dialog, but it jumps back and forth, making it impossible to enter anything into it, at least on my computer using a Wacom stylus and tablet. But the mode is terrific so long as I exit it before attempting to edit or create a new brush preset.

Screen shots for compact mode
Select Compact mode from the panel menu to create a very small panel easily floated anywhere you want it, or keep it docked as an icon. The panel will automatically pop open on hover and shrink back again when you move your cursor away. (Does not currently work properly in Edit mode)

I’ve been told that the developer is now working to offer previewing by name, marking brushes as favorites, and eventually, loading and saving sets of brushes so those of us with far too many don’t have to load them all in order to keep them organized through MagicSquire. I can hardly wait!

One word of advice for anyone who decides to get MagicSquire: if you’re running 2017, you’ll also want to pick up the free Extension Manager from the Anastasiy website in order to install it, and not try to use the now-deprecated Adobe Extension Manager.

"The Refugee" an art journal page for Democracy series
“The Refugee” in my Democracy series — The quote is a selection from Warsan Shire’s poem “Home.” Other credits go to Rebecca McMeen and The Urban Fairy for several of the design elements.